Good Luck Animals Around The World

I don’t know about you, but when I’m playing online casino games, nothing seems to up my luck factor like having a hideous, flying rodent sitting on my shoulder. A bat, to be more specific, and I’ll confirm that the effort of keeping a live bat fit and healthy is well worth it. What, you’ve never kept a good luck bat flapping around your apartment? Well shame on you, because everyone knows that bats are the luckiest of God’s screeching nocturnal beasts.

No, of course I don’t really have a living bat in my apartment. It turns out, however, that bats are considered to be incredibly lucky, specifically in China. The grotesque monstrosities are apparently synonymous for good luck in the Far East, so much so that folks get bat pendants, and even tattoos, in an effort to draw good fortune in their general direction. It may seem odd to those living on the other side of the world, but then I dare you to tell me how a horse shoe, or four-leaf clover, is a more logical choice for a good luck symbol!

Either way, it turned out that there are many good luck animals around the world, with these being the most prominent:

Bears

I rather like bears. They seem like awfully dopey and lovable creatures, at least when they’re not mauling people to death. If it cames to choosing between a good luck bat and good luck bear, I’d probably stick with the bat, simply because there is less of a chance of a bat deciding to make me it’s next lunchtime snack.

There are many cultures that would choose a good luck bear, however, most notably the Native Americans. In Native American culture, the bear was highly respected, and thought even to be in possession of a few magical abilities. Why? Very simply because the bear managed to stay alive and healthy through winter, while also managing to stay plump and healthy. As good enough a reason to respect any creature, as far as I’m concerned, but I still wouldn’t have one living in my apartment.

Egyptian Scarab Beetle

The ancient Egyptians really had a clingy relationship with the sun. And, back in the day, I’m sure the sun really was a big deal. After all, if the sun felt like it, it could fry your crops and leave you starving. Or, if it was in a good mood, it could give just the right amount of sun, plus a little rain, to give you all the crops you could ask for.

The scarab beetle, on the other hand, knew how to handle the sun in all its moods. And with the incredible power of its insect brain, it even used the sun to its advantage, such as with rolling up eggs in dung, and letting the sun bake them into life. So yes, the Egyptians were also big on the scarab beetle. It was believed that scarabs not only brought good luck, but also had an important part to play in life and rebirth.

Bull

The bull was big in many cultures back in the day, and remains a firm favourite even today. The Greeks had a big bull fetish most of all, and revered it for its incredibly proud and intimidating nature. There were very few who faced a bull that did not quickly come to respect just how dominating the beast could be. And I dare you to face a bull and not come to the same conclusion, assuming that the beast is not behind a fence.

So, for these reasons the bull became a symbol of strength, good luck, and virility in Greek culture, which it remains today. Bulls also play a part in Egyptian, East Indian, and Celtic cultures. Once again, if choosing between a bat, bear, or bull good luck animal to live in my apartment, the bat still looks like the best option. God knows a bull would very likely hog the bed covers.

Cricket

The cricket is acclaimed in many cultures, and widely acknowledged as a good luck symbol, and friendly companion. Though, I did a little research, and it may not be for the reasons many assume. It turns out that many ancient cultures relied on crickets as guard dogs. And no, obviously not because it’s possible to train crickets to attack on command.

Instead, and I must say this is rather smart; it was the noisy nature of the cricket that was relied upon. You’ve probably noticed that crickets go silent when you get near them, reliably so, hence making them excellent at detecting intruders. And so, many ancient cultures kept them near their places of living, as a way to ensure that no one could approach them without being detected. Good luck indeed. And I think I just found a replacement for my shrieking bat friend.

Marc Armstrong - Signature

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